Home Page
About
Sculpture
Father - ceramic 2010-11
Sculpture garden in Yuvalim
Indoor Installations
Israel Museum 1981
Icons 1994-5
Cocoons 1998
Shells 2001
Ex-Voto-Golden Leaves 2002
Landscapes 2005
Juego de Pelota 2005
Panorama 2004
kites 2008-9
In the footstep of the terra cotta warriors 2010
Prepration- self shelter 2010-11
Outdoor Sculpture
Golgotha
Landscape Windows
Human Fossils
Steps to the Sky
Monoliths
Netted Rock Portraits
Trees Sculptures
Pipes and Rocks
Invironmental Art
Back to sea - Arsuf 2012
India 2012
Karmiel-Tefen road 1993-94
Austria 1989,94
Emek Yizra'el College 1988,1994
Mitzpe Ramon 1986
Memorial sites
Moledet 1977
Parod 1979
Ein Harod Me'uhad 1984
Lohame Hageta'ot 1987
Bet Zera 1987
Tirat Zvi 1989
Yuvalim 1997
Misgav 1999-2006
Mixed Technique Sculpture
Basalt and other materials 1980-1990
Colored sculptures 1991-2
Portraits 1995
Chairs 1996
Ships Skeletons 1999
Wheelchairs 2006
Two dimension
X-rays drawings
Latest Works
Uneven Gate - India - 2012
Negative Portraits
Exhibitions
Father - ceramic 2010-11
Latest Exhibitions
Erosion 2012
Dalia at work
Contact
  Latest Exhibitions > Erosion 2012  
 

 Disintegration – Dalia Meiri

 Dalia Meiri’s sculptures address the human body and its transformations over time; from the young, muscular, strong and attractive body to its ageing, wearing and disintegration.
Meiri accompanied her father on his journey through the final chapter of his life. In her works she traces the gradual transformation undergone by body and mind. She speaks of the role reversals of father / grandfather / son in the wake of loss of self-assurance and reliance on one’s children in the decision-making process. She tells of the strong influence on her of the painting Spanish Charity by Matthias Meyvogel, a depiction of the story of a prisoner sentenced to death by starvation, and his daughter, who visits him and breast-feeds him to keep him alive. Because of her daring and original devotion the warders take pity on the father and release him. This tale has provided inspiration for many works by important artists throughout history.
Eric Ericsson[1] considered old age to be a further developmental stage in human life. It offers the ability to view the continuity of life from beginning to end, obtaining a full and positive perspective of the totality of the life cycle. This may lead to an acceptance of oneself and to gratifying appreciation of ones successes and achievements. This perspective likewise encompasses the capacity to regard those who follow us as a new link in the chain, in whose creation the old person played an active role. Ericsson takes an optimistic approach, according to which one can choose how to experience the final stage of life. Despite the failings of the body, coming to terms with one’s impediments enables a person to see the positives and enjoy the small things in life.
Meiri has exchanged large hard stone for soft clay, producing modest sculptures of small dimensions, befitting the topic. She associates the crumbly, vulnerable and fragile clay with the fragility of the crumbling skeleton threatening to collapse. Her sculptures were fired by the rako method, whereby the frontal exterior layer is coated with a white cracked glaze and the back of the sculpture is blackened by soot. The sculpture’s exterior looks attractive and complete, while the blackened interior is devoid of content, on the verge of disintegration. This engagement with the material and its shell is likewise manifested in the installation titled Order of the Clay Knights, created in the first person plural. Meiri reproduced parts of her body and that of her husband, placing them like anonymous soldiers standing on parade.  
Planted in place on iron rods, they stand naked, exposing the ravages of their body. The clay flakes that cover them remind us that humanity’s true encounter is with the unknown period of time allocated to it: “Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.”
The installation was inspired by the terracotta warriors she saw on a visit to China some years ago, in the mausoleum of the emperor in the city of Xi'an. The thousands of life size clay soldiers were created over two thousand years ago to protect Emperor Qin Shi Huang on his journey to the afterworld. Upon the emperor’s death rebels broke into the mausoleum, shattering the figures.
The final chapter of human life is mentioned in Jewish sources. Hazal maintain that old age imbues one with wisdom. These years were referred to as the Shabat years: “When a person becomes sixty and enters the seventh decade of their life they become old and their years are all shabat.” Apprehension of the hardships of old age is also found in Judaism in the Avinu Malkeinu prayer, which contains the request “cast me not off in the time of old age, forsake me not when my strength faileth.”
 This exhibition encourages us to look into the soul, induces thoughts and musings on the essence of life and existence. Dalia Meiri’s works boldly and sincerely look us straight in the eye.
 

[1]Author of the psycho-social stages theory, a leading theory in developmental psychology. 
      
1234
תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה -
 
דף הבית
קורות חיים
פיסול
גן הפסלים ביובלים
מיצבים
פיסול חוץ
פיסול סביבתי
אנדרטאות
פסלים בטכניקות מעורבות
דו מימד
עבודות אחרונות
תערוכות
סדרת פסלי אבא 2010-11
התפוררות 2012
סדקים 2013
תערוכות אחרונות
דליה בעבודה
צור קשר
עיצוב ובניית האתר meiriyuvalim@gmail.com כל הזכויות שמורות לדליה מאירי - נייד: 0544-331965 מספר מבקרים
studio-viti 91,837
Home Page
About
Sculpture
Father - ceramic 2010-11
Sculpture garden in Yuvalim
Indoor Installations
Israel Museum 1981
Icons 1994-5
Cocoons 1998
Shells 2001
Ex-Voto-Golden Leaves 2002
Landscapes 2005
Juego de Pelota 2005
Panorama 2004
kites 2008-9
In the footstep of the terra cotta warriors 2010
Prepration- self shelter 2010-11
Outdoor Sculpture
Golgotha
Landscape Windows
Human Fossils
Steps to the Sky
Monoliths
Netted Rock Portraits
Trees Sculptures
Pipes and Rocks
Invironmental Art
Back to sea - Arsuf 2012
India 2012
Karmiel-Tefen road 1993-94
Austria 1989,94
Emek Yizra'el College 1988,1994
Mitzpe Ramon 1986
Memorial sites
Moledet 1977
Parod 1979
Ein Harod Me'uhad 1984
Lohame Hageta'ot 1987
Bet Zera 1987
Tirat Zvi 1989
Yuvalim 1997
Misgav 1999-2006
Mixed Technique Sculpture
Basalt and other materials 1980-1990
Colored sculptures 1991-2
Portraits 1995
Chairs 1996
Ships Skeletons 1999
Wheelchairs 2006
Two dimension
X-rays drawings
Latest Works
Uneven Gate - India - 2012
Negative Portraits
Exhibitions
Father - ceramic 2010-11
Latest Exhibitions
Erosion 2012
Dalia at work
Contact
  Latest Exhibitions > Erosion 2012  
 

 Disintegration – Dalia Meiri

 Dalia Meiri’s sculptures address the human body and its transformations over time; from the young, muscular, strong and attractive body to its ageing, wearing and disintegration.
Meiri accompanied her father on his journey through the final chapter of his life. In her works she traces the gradual transformation undergone by body and mind. She speaks of the role reversals of father / grandfather / son in the wake of loss of self-assurance and reliance on one’s children in the decision-making process. She tells of the strong influence on her of the painting Spanish Charity by Matthias Meyvogel, a depiction of the story of a prisoner sentenced to death by starvation, and his daughter, who visits him and breast-feeds him to keep him alive. Because of her daring and original devotion the warders take pity on the father and release him. This tale has provided inspiration for many works by important artists throughout history.
Eric Ericsson[1] considered old age to be a further developmental stage in human life. It offers the ability to view the continuity of life from beginning to end, obtaining a full and positive perspective of the totality of the life cycle. This may lead to an acceptance of oneself and to gratifying appreciation of ones successes and achievements. This perspective likewise encompasses the capacity to regard those who follow us as a new link in the chain, in whose creation the old person played an active role. Ericsson takes an optimistic approach, according to which one can choose how to experience the final stage of life. Despite the failings of the body, coming to terms with one’s impediments enables a person to see the positives and enjoy the small things in life.
Meiri has exchanged large hard stone for soft clay, producing modest sculptures of small dimensions, befitting the topic. She associates the crumbly, vulnerable and fragile clay with the fragility of the crumbling skeleton threatening to collapse. Her sculptures were fired by the rako method, whereby the frontal exterior layer is coated with a white cracked glaze and the back of the sculpture is blackened by soot. The sculpture’s exterior looks attractive and complete, while the blackened interior is devoid of content, on the verge of disintegration. This engagement with the material and its shell is likewise manifested in the installation titled Order of the Clay Knights, created in the first person plural. Meiri reproduced parts of her body and that of her husband, placing them like anonymous soldiers standing on parade.  
Planted in place on iron rods, they stand naked, exposing the ravages of their body. The clay flakes that cover them remind us that humanity’s true encounter is with the unknown period of time allocated to it: “Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.”
The installation was inspired by the terracotta warriors she saw on a visit to China some years ago, in the mausoleum of the emperor in the city of Xi'an. The thousands of life size clay soldiers were created over two thousand years ago to protect Emperor Qin Shi Huang on his journey to the afterworld. Upon the emperor’s death rebels broke into the mausoleum, shattering the figures.
The final chapter of human life is mentioned in Jewish sources. Hazal maintain that old age imbues one with wisdom. These years were referred to as the Shabat years: “When a person becomes sixty and enters the seventh decade of their life they become old and their years are all shabat.” Apprehension of the hardships of old age is also found in Judaism in the Avinu Malkeinu prayer, which contains the request “cast me not off in the time of old age, forsake me not when my strength faileth.”
 This exhibition encourages us to look into the soul, induces thoughts and musings on the essence of life and existence. Dalia Meiri’s works boldly and sincerely look us straight in the eye.
 

[1]Author of the psycho-social stages theory, a leading theory in developmental psychology. 
      
1234
תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה - תיאור התמונה -
 
דף הבית
קורות חיים
פיסול
גן הפסלים ביובלים
מיצבים
פיסול חוץ
פיסול סביבתי
אנדרטאות
פסלים בטכניקות מעורבות
דו מימד
עבודות אחרונות
תערוכות
סדרת פסלי אבא 2010-11
התפוררות 2012
סדקים 2013
תערוכות אחרונות
דליה בעבודה
צור קשר
עיצוב ובניית האתר meiriyuvalim@gmail.com כל הזכויות שמורות לדליה מאירי - נייד: 0544-331965 מספר מבקרים
studio-viti 91,837